Sunday, December 10, 2023

Sunday Selections

I'm joining in with Elephant's Child, River and others with Sunday Selections. This week the selections are photos I've taken of buildings which I found to be of interest in some way, and I have rather a backlog of them. 

I took a mural photo near here and noticed the lovely vertical garden. Not being neatly trimmed is part of its appeal. 


This is not really a building, well there is a building behind the walls and a nice garden. It's the Melbourne Club. Rich and powerful white men with the right antecedents are generally welcome. If there is a sniff of a scandal about you beyond an underage sex charge or a tax avoidance charge, or you don't meet the other criteria, bugger orf. 


I've no idea about this display but it looks like a nice repurposed old building.


In 1980 a workmate had a fling with a hairdresser who lived near us in Elwood. He became our hairdresser and we socialised a bit with him. Even once we moved from Elwood, we still had our hair cut by Trevor. His salon was in Russell Street in the city but he moved to Gordon House after it was renovated.. Gordon House used to be a place for homeless single men. 



From Elwood we moved to East Malvern I think in 1982, to one of a pair two minutes walk from the tram terminus. The owner of the other half was the sister of artist Albert Tucker. As I recently ticked off the route 3 tram with tram trips on every line, I walked for five minutes to take a photo of our old house. We renovated it but it has been much renovated since. You may have picked up the two minute walk and the five minute walk. I was twenty five in 1982. 


My roses have all gone but most of the trees remain, including the fig tree in the photo above, who a number of neighbours used to strip of figs.



Albert Park. I was gobsmacked by the prices for US confectionary, and I reckon US folk would be too. I bought nothing. 


This was a surprise to me, in Victoria Avenue, Albert Park. It's such a nice house.


But look at what they have in the small front garden. 


My photos don't do it justice. 


I tried but I couldn't get a better photo and the shop was closed. I've seen Budapest and Vienna and they are fabulous cities, all that I expected and more, and I always wanted to visit Prague, but alas as Yorkshire Pudding recently lamented, you reach an age where you know it just ain't gonna 'appen. 

32 comments:

  1. You are sooo right about the house in Victoria Avenue. And sadly about the relative speed of walking - then and now.

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    1. Aye EC. I slightly exaggerated walking speeds but that how is how it is for some of us. We are slow.

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  2. What great photos and tales. Thank you for sharing. You must know I want that water feature. lol You're way more traveled than we, and maybe another trip is in your future. One can hope, right?

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    1. Darla, at my and R's ages, travel insurance is prohibitive and we can only visit countries with reciprocal medical agreements with out country. I think Australia has one with Canada but the US is a whole different kettle of fish. Maybe there is another trip to see R's family. I don't know.

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  3. Ooh yes. If I ever decide to move to Victoria, that house in Albert Park would do me. I would even feed the fish.

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    1. JayCee, it is quintessential Victorian architecture of the period. It would have been dark and gloomy inside but now there will be a bright and brilliant back extension.

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  4. Really a fun series. The old Victorian era facade is very charming. The USA candy shop is quite unique which I know nothing about.

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    1. Roentare, I wonder what the demand for US candy is our country? Not so high I guess and I expect my photo will soon become historical.

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  5. I love that wild vertical garden; it's fabulous.
    But that house that overdid itself and its garden? Oh, honey, no.

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    1. I think your opinion may have been outvoted Bob. I will just add that it is now a private medical facility, not a home.

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  6. I worked for Lifeline in '74/75. I remember some of the men from Gordon House and the concern when it faced closure and it was such a needed facility. Ozanam House in North Melbourne took some of the slack from memory.
    The fish pond is delightful. Obviously Albert Park is a cat free area!

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    1. Merlot, I had forgotten about Ozanam House and even where it was.
      Good fencing rather than cat free, I think.

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  7. Tax avoidance isn't a crime. In capitalist circles, it is a badge of honour.

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    1. Literally tax avoidance isn't a crime Hels. Tax evasion is though. Respect to tax evaders who are smarter than all, until they are caught.

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  8. A greta post.Love all the different buildings and the stories

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    1. Diane, it is nice to add some detail to buildings.

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  9. There used to be an English sweety shop in our area that sold Dolly Mix and Fruit Gums as well as other remembered childhood treats. Not there anymore- closed with a sign that said ‘find us online’.

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    1. Cathy, English sweet shops seem to be gone now. Such a shame. Online is manageable though.

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  10. I wonder if those things hanging off that building are chef's hats and why? I see in picture #9 you have your own Hamburgers store (*~*)
    I like the old house in #10, I've seen many similar here in Adelaide, but without the fountains and fish ponds.

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    1. Lol River. I wonder if anyone would pick up on Andrew's Hamburgers. Advertising comes in many ways and this single shop will become my empire of hamburger joints.

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  11. The Manchester House is drop dead gorgeous. Everything about it! Stunning. I'd be interested in seeing what USA treats are. From the window, it looks pretty much like all the crap food they warn people against eating because it is unhealthy.

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    1. Manchester House is fairly typical of many inner Melbourne suburban houses, but cheek by jowl, there could be a small workers cottage next door.

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  12. Victoria Avenue, Albert Park. Appropriately named. The late queen and her hubby might want to stay in that eye-catching house for the night while visiting what at the time was one of Her Majesty's colonies. Love the goldfish, or whatever species they are.

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    1. Fit for a queen, hey Kirk. Her Maj used to stay at Government House. I call the goldfish carp as that is pretty well what they are.

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  13. Nice selection Andrew. Love that terrace house, it's beautiful.

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  14. Fun to see the places you have lived. The US Treats being expensive is interesting, here in DC there are a few shops selling asian treats, mostly from Japan, and the prices can be shocking, but the flavors are fun.

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    1. TP, yes we have Asian sweet shops too but I haven't tried them.

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  15. I love that vertical garden. Here a garden against a wooden building invites bug infestations and rot with all our rain. I recognize some of those breakfast cereal boxes, like cheerios, Fruit Loops and Frosted Flakes. They are expensive here too.

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    1. Strayer, we have our own Fruit Loops and Frosties as we call them and I bet they taste quite different to your own.

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  16. I imagine a tax avoidance charge is pretty much a REQUIREMENT for the Melbourne Club!

    In London, those American candy shops have drawn scrutiny for being money-laundering operations. There's been press coverage. Google it! I wonder if Australia is seeing some of the same activity?

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    1. Steve, that is interesting. I'll google it now.

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