Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Blogging

Yorkshire Pudding recently pondered on the world of blog. I will do the same. 

I can be described as a well brought up, self educated working class person. That I could retire at the age of 61 as a self funded retiree is down to me working a crap job for 40 years. At times I would arise at 3am and at times go to bed at 3am. To put it frankly, like a garbage collector, it was a very important job, as people discover when garbage isn't collected. 

So, back to my point. Blogging is classless, with some bloggers who are financially very comfortable, some wo are not but they all contribute to world of the blog and the world wide connections are truly amazing. Blogging as we know it might disappear in the future as our generation dies out, and that will be loss, but the electrics are still there. Your blog will probably be around for eternity. It is more than possible that our youngest relatives will see the year 3000 2100. Googling relatives will be a thing of the past. It will be one click, or you will put on a helmet and the information will be transferred to your brain. Who knows?

But let me assure you, over the last thirty years bloggers will go on to become an invaluable resource and will continue to be so for eons, and become a great historical resource, yet a doubtful historical source as mostly what they write about relies on memories, short and long term. Historians will hate what we have written but there will be many clues to the truth for them. 

What social bloggers will really contribute is a snapshot of society in the period we have blogged and continue to blog, pretty well much of the early 21st century. Our pleasure, our pain, our thoughts, our social attitudes, our politics...well a long list, and it will all shine through. Your blog is not Facebook aka Bragbook. Don't underestimate what you are contributing to history and you will be admired for your honest writing. 

In the light of that, at a hospital today I heard the words 'I will cut here'. What was a small lump in an  incision wound after last year's kidney surgery, became larger and needs to be repaired. It's known as a surgical hernia. Last year's surgery was with a private surgeon. It cost me a few thousand dollars and my health insurance company around $12,000. I can't afford to use private health in spite of having private health insurance. The highly esteemed kidney surgeon told me during a three minute $180 phone consultation, that he could recommend a surgeon to repair his perhaps negligent work, given I'd had hernia repair surgery before. I am sure he could give me a mate's name, who would also charge thousands of dollars. 

The free public health system is doing quite well for me, but $10 for parking! Barley Charlie. Otherwise it costs nothing. 

49 comments:

  1. Get well soon.

    As for what our culture leaves behind for future archeologists, maybe 100, 000 times more than did ancient Rome. Not just from cyberspace, but also from centuries of mass-prodution. Of course, that mass-production could end up wiping out our civilization much more thoroughly than the Goths, Visigoths, Vandals, and Huns did the Romans, but nevertheless, we'll still leave more stuff behind.

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    1. I feel fine Kirk. It is preventative surgery as it could enlarge and it might look like I am preggers.
      What we leave will interest some, but for most part it will be uninteresting history. Magical online crawlers will hunt out precise information without distracting links, but rabbit holes can be interesting to go down.
      I can't see anything inherently wrong with mass production as long as it is sustainable and the products' end of life is correctly dealt with.

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  2. When I found, and later jumped into the blogosphere, I felt I had come home. It is a privilege to be invited into the homes, heads, hearts and lives of bloggers. And a source of both knowledge and entertainment. And, for my severely introverted self, something I could not do in the flesh.

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    1. ps: Which I should have said first. I hope the hernia repair goes well. Himself has now had three such operations. Not fun.

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    2. EC, I expect many of us feel similar. It is an effort to be social in person but online, it is not so hard. Yes, I remember one drama over Himself's hernia repair. Thanks.

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  3. Ye Gods. How does that surgeon get away with what seems to be shoddy work and shady practice??
    I hope you get sorted out Andrew.

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    1. JayCee, I just don't know if it was shoddy work. My thought was was that he knew of my previous hernia surgery, it is rather obvious, and...I don't know...extra tight or more stitching? He is above a doctor, a Mr, a surgeon and is an Associate Professor. That title doesn't come easily and the surgery was robotic, with a high level of skill needed.

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  4. No one will be reading my rubbish. It will become inaccessible when the custom domain mane expires.

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    1. I think that will be a shame Tasker. You have a good record of some history, along with the personal aspect.

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    2. I'll second Andrew on that statement.

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    3. Graham, me feels Tasker is being too modest.

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  5. Wait -- "our youngest relatives will see the year 3000"? Surely not. Maybe 2100.

    I love blogging and I love reading blogs. I think they're much more satisfying that Instagram snaps or quick Facebook posts. But I suppose those formats essentially ARE blogging for many people. So maybe blogging won't die, but simply keep evolving (or devolving) into new things.

    I hope my blog hangs around forever. I'd hate to think I'm putting all this work into something that could vanish someday. But anything is possible, as you know from your own experience!

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    1. Steve, I knew that number was wrong as I typed it and meant to return to correct it but I forgot.
      I still regret the loss of my old blog. To use one Google account for everything is so easy but as I discovered, possibly unwise. At least my blog was mostly archived and available for research.

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  6. I've had a lot of value out of my blog, started many years ago when I was a full on caregiver of a partner who had become totally disabled. The connections kept me going through difficult years when medical personnel were our chief human contracts.
    I really treasure the help and friendship blog friends gave me, and I try to reciprocate.

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    1. That's nice to hear Boud. I hope, well I know, I would receive similar if I was in that situation. I must have a back read of your blog.

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  7. I, too, would like to think my blog will forever float through the interwebz and people will stumble across it and think what they will of it.

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    1. They may wonder who is the #thing 45, and then be horrified by what they read.

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  8. Once I thought blogging was going to last forever. Then 12 years ago, I read that no companies will take over the blogger forcing me to move on. Blogging is almost like a form of "journalling" seeing ourselves as "Id". Sorry about your additional medical hassle.

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    1. Yes, all quite true Roentare. Medical matters...they get me out and about.

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  9. You and M. Pudding raise some good points.
    Blogging is a snapshot of the small person. The mundane, if you like. Like the letters sent home from war or from children in boarding school. I just hope nobody else offends the Great God Google and gets sent into permanent exile.
    Good luck with your surgery.

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    1. Merlot, isn't blogging so levelling. We talk about our personal matters, up to a point. Like war and school letters, we couch our words carefully because we know they will be read.

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  10. Good luck with your surgery, Andrew. You are lucky to live in a country that makes this care possible.

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    1. Thanks Debby, and yes, I know but our system is far from perfect.

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  11. Any youngest relatives born this year would be 976 by the year 3000, I don't think life extension times will make that possible, though people might begin to live longer than they do now, depending on their circumstances of course.
    Hope the surgery is quick and easy. In my opinion, the doctor who caused the lump should also be removing it, free of charge.

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    1. River, as Steve said above in a comment and I've fixed my grave arithmetical error.
      I really don't know about the surgeon and fault. I'm sure fault will be covered in protective disclaimers that I probably signed. What pissed me orf was his lack of concern.

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  12. Sorry to hear about your further surgery, which should not have been necessary (said from the lofty heights of my non-medical background)
    Good luck and a better surgeon.

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    1. I really don't know JB. My heart tells me it shouldn't have happened but my head tells me it was surgical risk factor.

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  13. Interesting thoughts you have on blogging Andrew.
    It's ridiculous the prices surgeons charge well above the recommended fee know doubt, all out to make money even though they have studied for years.

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    1. Margaret, it was interesting to see him scrubs rather than the most expensive and well cut men's suit I've ever seen when I saw him at his rooms.

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  14. I missed Yorkies post on blogging so I'm glad you alerted me.
    I sometimes wonder if I should try to get private hospital insurance but you have a great point, it's not just the insurance that costs, it's all the gap fees etc.
    When I had to buy a cpap machine, there was a suggestion that private insurance might cover it and because it seemed like it might qualify as an extra, (and I have extras insurance) I looked it up. Nope. My $2000 machine, despite having nothing whatsoever to do with a hospital, was covered by hospital cover.
    Well, that was a diversion and I really i ntended to say I hope the surgery goes well :)

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    1. Kylie, yes gap fees, what is called I think in the US as co-payments. I never thought cpap machines would be covered by anything. I've looked at extras cover so many times and I can't seeing it make sense for us.

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  15. Oh if only genealogy could be that easy - put your ‘thinking cap’ on and it will appear like magic😊
    Blogging (to me) is like a cuppa tea and a chat. It depends who’s sitting at the table as to whether you’re interested in what they have to say. There’s the know it all friend who thinks they have the answer to everything ( I know 5 ways to …….) the home decorator friend (learn how to update this that or the other) the proud grandma, the hassled parent, etc etc……plus of course your ‘real friends’ who just tell you about their life - and how it’s going.
    And of course extra to any gap payments on some private ins premiums there are also excesses - a set amount each admission. You are lucky to have your problem seen to by the public system without having to wait for ages.

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    1. Cathy, while it is simple enough to churn out blog posts, you have to work to make the connections, as I am sure you know as you do so. Bloggers seem to me to be rather smart people.
      The wait for The Alfred proper would have been longer, but the Sandringham Alfred is quicker for appointments and surgery, but oh, a simple few stops by tram or a stroll, against a horrible drive and awful carparking...speed comes at a cost. I had about a five week wait for the consultation, not bad. I've had long waits in the private system too.

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  16. I hadn't thought about it, but blogger cross class and income. In my daily read list is someone who regularly stays in $1,000 a night hotels, and someone who couldn't afford to travel a state away for a funeral. Both blog the same, and both are a worthy read.

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    1. TP, I think I know who you are referring to about the funeral. Great writing skills are not needed. Just write, post and comment.

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  17. Andrew,

    First bit eloquent indeed. Time alone will tell if it stirs m.e from my insufficiently regretted present blog somnolence.

    Second bit: hope all goes well. Once you get a foot in the door, the public system is better than it is talked-down to be by private insurers.

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    1. MC, I hope my trust in not misplaced but I like to think our public system correctly prioritises by need, taking into account a number of factors.

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  18. What a wonderful post, Andrew. Contributing to history...
    I'm sorry to hear you have to go through another surgery. And charging you for a phone call, burns my biscuits. Keep us posted.
    Sandra sandracox.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks Sandra. Yes, that phone call was the icing on the cake. I know I was paying for his expertise, but still.

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  19. Sorry to hear of your surgical problems. Hope it all gets sorted out for you without too much future pain and discomfort. I've been blogging for about 13 years and in all that time I've had kind and generous comments; been lucky to meet 5 other bloggers and feel I have friends all over the world. Blogging has been a surprise feature of my retirement.

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    1. Fun60, while I was blogging long before retiring and had met bloggers It has taken on a more serious dimension since retirement.

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  20. What a thought provoking post. Thank you for sharing.

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  21. I love your thoughts on blogging. I started when things were a bit overwhelming in real life and found it a nice escape to other places. And interacting with people all over the world is such fun. A bit of an introvert I don't reveal as much as some people but to each his/her won way. I'm very glad to have discovered your blog, Andrew. ;-)

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    1. That's very kind Pat. I rarely commented back when I first came across your blog via Grace in Perth, who we were fortunate enough to meet a couple of times.

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  22. I say to people "I have friends in Australia" to sound important and more worldly. That's you, Andrew, by the way, and then E.C. too.

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    1. Strayer, I have been known to say, I know kind and decent people in the US who are as horrified by #45 as we are.

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  23. I have all along found blogging a great platform and a great window to the world. Like all social media platforms, it all depends on whom you follow. And there many very good blogs around from which I have learnt a lot about different cultures, and traditions in different parts of the world. I have also been able to strike a personal rapport with a few bloggers too. I think blogs will surely be around.

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    1. I agree with you Pradeep and I hope you are correct about blogging staying around.

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